« Come! | Main | Links Mentioned on the Show »

December 18, 2011

Comments

"God in the form of man"?

- Isn't that Docetism?

"God in the form of man" sounds familiar...Philippians 2:6-7 (NASB)
"who, although He existed in the form of God, did not regard equality with God a thing to be grasped,
7 but emptied Himself, taking the form of a bond-servant, and being made in the likeness of men."

Give me Genesis 1:1 and the rest of the Bible poses no problem for me.
A.W. Tozer.

James,

Docetism rejects that God has come in the flesh, so "God in the form of man" is not Docetism.

The confusion might be in the word "form." It's not being used as mere appearance (for example, if someone appeared in the "form," or appearance, of something else), but as in the very substance--actually "being made" as something, not just appearing in the shape of that thing.

Thank you, Amy.
It seemed to me the piece was describing an Avatar, not Christ.

Hi Amy.

Thinking further on it, I suppose my belief in the mystery of Christ being fully man and fully God is re-presented at Mass through transubstantiation. Our worship and Christology are one, for Christ is truly present.

How does your 'form' of Eucharist express your Christology? Or are they separate issues?

Hi James, how do you propose to answer the question how Jesus' human nature is present in more than one place at a time? The Roman doctrine of transubstantiation with its Aristotelian framework is not defensible biblically. Of course Rome doesn't rely on the Bible, so maybe this doesn't bother you. The Person of the trinity Who is also a man cannot do what is being said about Him without violating a historic creed [Nicene].

btw, I'n not depending on using the Nicene Creed to prove that transubstantiation is unbiblical, I only mention it because Rome also embraces it as authoritative tradition to be believed as true. Except for the usual gymnastical twisting and tangling of authoritative sources, it would be obvious incoherency.

Note to self:

Put the word "gymnastical" in my leximicon. Or my dictionaminary.

Before Moses was "I am"

I wish you all the joys to which your beliefs entitle you.

RonH

The comments to this entry are closed.