« McLaren Advocates "Rethinking" Second Coming | Main | Oprah's Religion »

April 25, 2008

Comments

Even if we are unsure, shouldn't we err on the side of intrinsic value to all human life?

There is nothing lost in *not* killing the unborn.

The law forbids destroying the egg of a bald eagle for one reason. It is common sense that interfering with the eagle at this stage of development will result in the loss of a bald eagle, period.
Yet when it comes to the most innocent and precious thing there is, a human baby, U.S. law allows people to play God with life.
I wish the day would come when human babies are afforded the same protection as endangered animal species.

Excellent post Heath, thank you.

Wesley J. Smith argues for what he calls "human exceptionalism" quite frequently. Go to his blog at http://www.wesleyjsmith.com/blog/ and plug the words "human exceptionalism" into the blog search engine. This should keep you busy for a couple of months.

Regards.

Steve,

Good discussion. Tactically speaking, I would back up to ask the more fundamental question of why we should think anyone has the right to life? This question bypasses the question of criteria (which can easily sidetrack the conversation), going straight to the jugular: the grounding question. Forget haggling over what might make person X valuable, but person Y non-valuable. I want them to tell me why we ought to think that anyone has the right to life, including themselves. Where does such a right come from? Atheism cannot secure transcendent rights, and Darwinism makes mockery of the concept that one has a right to live. Only theism can ground the notion of transcendent rights, and only God could imbue us with value.

Then, maybe we can get to the issue of how any specific characteristic they might wish to propose as value-defining could be value-conferring or value-denying. We might ask how moral value inheres within the property of self-consciousness, or to provide a non-question begging argument for self-consciousness as a value-defining criterion for determining one’s right to life.

Jason

The comments to this entry are closed.