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« Pentecost | Main | Postmodernism, Truth and the Bible (Video) »

May 24, 2010

Comments

My take on the end was slightly different. They never said they were in heaven, so maybe it's wrong to assume that that's where they were. They found themselves in a place in which one can find representatives from all world religions...and our theology tells us that there really IS a place where the "lost" go which has representatives from all world religions. Just something to think about :)

You captured my thoughts on the finale and the show rather precisely, Melinda.

Interesting thought, Toby. However, the writers of LOST clearly don't understand "our theology" beyond the depth of general revelation. I'm sure the writers were trying to convey a theme of universal salvation. Had that actually been the place inhabited by the "lost" there would have been less smiling and hugging and more weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Was the theme "universal salvation" if Dr. Linus wouldn't go into the church? I think there's still an element of free will at play. Linus just can't let go, so he's stuck where he is, outside the church.

The parallel timeline of season 6 seemed to be a kind of purgatory, where the characters needed to remember and find the ones who they cared about when they were alive, and once they did that they could "move on." So I think the writers drew on some religious traditions there.

So the ultimate truth, the final destiny for the characters, wasn't Christianity, but I agree with Melinda. It worked great and was very rich and satisfying storytelling.

I think your point is very valid about non-Christians. The talented writers were able to weave a masterful tale, but in the end their story was weakened by their worldview. Of course that brings about an interesting discussion on myth and narrative. On one hand you could have heavy Christian imagery like Lewis' Narnia series, on the other you have a Tolkien like narrative in LOTR myth that plays within its own rules. I think LOST is like the latter, but for some reason I still feel like LOST was weakened a bit by its universalism type assumptions at the very end.

One of the writers is Catholic so perhaps Linus still has to resolve some issues in purgatory...mind you, non-Christians don't need to spend any time in purgatory according to the pluralistic stain glassed window in the Church, so maybe it is all about letting Linus coming in when he is ready. Does not Catholic theology believe in praying for the souls of the dead? Perhaps that is why it meant a lot to Linus to hear Locke forgive him...or again, maybe it's the secular notion that Linus needs to forgive himself (a la Jack Bauer in season 7) so that he can let HIMSELF into heaven. Yeah, that seems to make more sense...you were a great number 2 Linus, now forgive yourself and join the party. There's a beer waiting for you.

I think Linus couldn't quite let go just yet from Alex and Rousseau and the family he never had, and at the same time I don't think he felt like he still had a ways to go before he could earn his 'salvation' and belong with everyone else. Contrast that with Jack, who was able to let go of the son he never had.

.... always proofread people...

Strike that "don't". The sentence should read like this:

I think Linus couldn't quite let go just yet from Alex and Rousseau and the family he never had, and at the same time I think he felt like he still had a ways to go before he could earn his 'salvation' and find a sense of belonging with everyone else.

They were in Hades, awaiting hell.

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